Kansas State Wildcats

Nae’Qwan Tomlin Situation Showing Poor Communication Among K-State Administration

NCAA Basketball: NCAA Tournament East Regional Practice

K-State forward Nae’Qwan Tomlin was dismissed from the Wildcats’ basketball program on Wednesday, bringing an apparent end to the saga that has loomed over Jerome Tang’s program since the beginning of the 2023-24 season.

However, poor communication amongst the K-State administration has led to an uncomfortable and difficult situation for Tomlin, his family, and the Kansas State basketball team.

According to Fox 4’s Grant Flanders, Tomlin’s family traveled from out of town to see him play against Villanova on Tuesday. However, Tomlin was on the bench but was in street clothes and not able to participate in the Wildcats’ 72-71 OT win.

 

It seems quite obvious at this point that there’s been a lapse in communication on this situation, as not much about it makes sense. Why drag out a suspension for this length of time just to dismiss Tomlin from the team after he’s missed nine games?

On top of that, why do the Wildcats keep giving cookie-cutter answers and deflecting questions ont he situation? If Tomlin was granted diversion in the case and could’ve made a return to the court, why didn’t he?

Gene Taylor’s statement yesterday provided no context whatsoever either, and saying that this will be the final time they will address the issue proves they’d rather keep their fanbase ignorant to the situation and just trust they’re doing the best thing for the program. The problem is, that nobody in or around Manhattan seems to believe that at this point, especially not when it concerns University President Richard Linton.

There’s something much more serious going on inside the K-State basketball program, or there is some serious head-butting going on between the powers that be in Manhattan.

Either way, it appears we’ve seen the last of Nae’Qwan Tomlin at Kansas State, and that’s a major loss for a program trying to build on an Elite Eight appearance back in March.

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