Football

Postscripts: College Football’s Future Super League, Jerome Tang Stays

NCAA Football: Northwestern at Wisconsin

What’s going on in the Big 12 and beyond? I expand and explain every Sunday in Postscripts at Heartland College Sports, your home for independent Big 12 coverage.

This week, Super League is coming, Tang is staying and Deion is dropping wisdom.

Sorry for the minor delay. On vacation for a couple of weeks to spend some time with my mom.  

 

Super League (Or Some Form Of It) Is Coming

I mentioned my vacation because it kept me from participating in our latest roundtable — is an 80-Team Super League the Future of College Football?

I don’t know if it will be 80 teams, but, yes, something like it is coming. It’s inevitable. Why?

Football is simultaneously driving the bus and screwing things up. Everyone loves the revenue. Few love USC and UCLA going to the Big Ten. But when football revenue — and the TV revenue that comes from it — drives the bus, well geography and common sense go out the window. You can make the same argument about the Big 12 — which will stretch from Florida to Arizona come July — if we’re being honest.

There is an enormous gap financially between the Power 4 and the rest of college sports. That gap will only grow in the coming years and it will leave not only the Group of 5 behind, but some of the Power league schools, too. But they have the advantage of being grandfathered in.

 

The NCAA won’t stand in the way of any of this because the NCAA in truth has little to do with college football, aside from the regulatory aspect — and the entity is awful at that.

So, yes, at some point, those 60 or so schools that want to play football at that level, want to invest the money to compete at that level and have no problem leaving the rest of the Greek chorus behind will do so.

But it won’t happen right now because, reportedly, the Big Ten, the SEC and ESPN all seem lukewarm to the idea. That’s logical. Both leagues have the best long-term TV contracts in the game, just rigged the new College Football Playoff TV contract in their favor and ESPN just completed those bruising contract negotiations, keeping all of the inventory. It makes no sense for them to blow it up right now.

But, eventually, it will make sense and they’ll lead the charge. Then everything will be at stake — including our precious NCAA Tournament.

Tang Stays at Kansas State (For Now)

Jerome Tang is staying as men’s basketball coach at Kansas State. I’m not sure things ever got serious with Arkansas after Eric Musselman left for USC, but Tang did the video message thing saying that he was staying for a third year.

I was, honestly, more worried about the SMU opening when it came to Tang simply because of his Texas roots. As for Andy Enfield leaving USC for SMU, I dunno. Seems odd. But we have to remind ourselves that SMU is an ACC job now.

I think what most of us are trying to figure out is how good — or how bad — the relationship is between Tang and K-State president Dr. Richard Linton. I made the intuitive leap that if Tang stayed, it means their relationship is, at the least, tolerable. So perhaps it is.

For the long-term health of the program, Kansas State fans certainly hope so.

 

Dan Skillings To Stay

Forget social media cards or flashy videos. Go get on ESPN+ during  a baseball game and tell the folks you’re staying for one more year.

That’s what Cincinnati guard Dan Skillings Jr. did this weekend after throwing out the first pitch of a Bearcats baseball game.

Short, to the point, no ambiguity. Love it. Of course, how WELL Skillings plays next season, thus improving his draft stock, may lead him to change his mind.

 

Deion Makes Points

Earlier this week Colorado coach Deion Sanders took to video to discuss the progress of some of his players in the classroom. Apparently one of their professors was so dismayed he told Sanders this —  “Students do not follow even minimally and it slows down my class so much. They make it clear that they don’t want to be here and have very little personal responsibility.”

So what did Sanders do? He had assistant coaches sit with each of the players in question and had them discuss their pro football prospects. Depending on the player, I could imagine some of these conversations were sobering.

Sanders’ point was that most of his players aren’t going to play in the NFL. As the NCAA commercials goes, “They’ll go pro in something else.”

“You gonna get something out of this,” Sanders said. “You gonna be a man or you’re going to be a great football player. Since you choose not to be a great football player, we gotta make you a man.”

Now, you may find this a little rich coming from Sanders, who made millions as an NFL player and whose sons have a stranglehold on the NIL space. You’re entitled to that opinion.

But it doesn’t make what he said any less true. College athletes have more opportunities than ever before. But the degree, and the opportunities that come with it, still matter.

It’s worth pointing out that Sanders eventually went back to college and finished his undergrad degree. What he’s saying is that he wants his kids to leave with their degree so they don’t have to come back like he did.

That degree, plus a little NIL money in their pocket, is going to give graduates a great foundation to start their adult life.

You can find Matthew Postins on Twitter @PostinsPostcard.

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